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I don’t think we can argue that as we age we are less able to do things physically, nor is this likely to change. The times people take to do events on the athletics field, even though they train hard, gradually get longer and longer as they get older.

Things may be different with mental achievement. It’s easy for people to remind us that we are constantly losing brain cells, and many older people seem to accept that ‘seniors moments’ only affect them, when in fact these forgetful moments occur through out life. Why should they be a ‘normal’ part of life when you are younger but not as you age?

Psychologists in particular seem to enjoy doing tests comparing us with youngsters in their 20’s, showing how older people do less well and conclude that we are deteriorating. More accurate tests in fact show that this isn’t the case. Often tests are the type which young people are used to doing, whereas older people haven’t done that sort of thing before. A bit of practice can change the results. Timed tests take older people longer as we have more information to sort through. Take the clock away and we can usually hold our own.

Current research suggests that the brain cells themselves are less vital than the connectors joining them. If we can increase these we actually become smarter- regardless of our age. We can increase their numbers by learning new things. I am convinced that it is also important to have goals and ambitions in all stages of life- rather than older people just filling in time until it runs out.

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